Irony Had a Gun


Here is my entry for this week’s 100-Word Challenge for Adults.  The prompt is:

….The flame flickered before….

A rock fell.  Was that a footstep?  My heart hammered like fists against my ribs.  The cave seemed my escape.  No way he saw me duck in here.  Right?

The fire was the mistake.  A dead giveaway.  Don’t bother excusing the pun.  I’m afraid of the dark.

No one messed with Dirty O’Neill and lived to tell about it.  I wouldn’t be breaking that trend either.  All for 50 grand.  Stupid.

The flame flickered before the shadow appeared.  It had a gun.  No time.  I threw myself on the flames.  Pitch black.  Fear’s the only hope and the irony burns.

 

To see my other 100-Word-Challenge entries go here.  To learn more about the 100-Word Challenge for Adults, and to see what this week’s prompt was, go here.

The Last Battle


This is my entry for this week’s 100-Word Challenge for Adults.  The challenge this week was to use the words:  “LIBERTY, EMPIRE, APPLE, YELLOW, and  ENORMOUS” to create a story of 100-words.

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Elijah Red and Portnoy Yellow stood gazing into the boughs of their creation.  Their efforts had come to fruition.  It was time.

The Kingdom of the Red Apple had forever been at odds with the Yellow Apple Empire.  The feud was threatening to explode again.  The younger generation needed antiquated-reminding there must be difference or both worlds would crumble.  War was imminent.

Elijah  grinned.  “This ought to set them on their ears.”

“Hope so,” Portnoy nodded.

Together the old men reached up and plucked another enormous half-yellow half-red apple from the tree.

“What shall we call them?”  Portnoy asked.

Liberty.”

To see my other 100-Word-Challenge entries go here.  To learn more about the 100-Word Challenge for Adults, and to see what this week’s prompt was, go here.

If you enjoyed this, you may also enjoy Charlie Chaplin and The Great Dictator: The Speech that Resounds Across Time

They Know


This is my entry for this week’s 100-Word Challenge for Adults.

Elsie lay across her cot like a damp rag in the sweltering afternoon heat.  She was trying to digest what she’d seen.  She’d followed the elephant herd  for days, but today was a revelation.  Textbook words long ago had come to life like some ethereal dream in the velvety haze of morning.

The herd had discovered the carcass of another pachyderm.  They gathered around it solemnly, and one by one, each member had caressed the heap of parched old bones.  They fondled pieces of the deceased and carefully set them back, then stood quietly.

“They know they’re elephants,” she whispered.

To see my other 100-Word-Challenge entries go here.  To learn more about the 100-Word Challenge for Adults, and to see what this week’s prompt was, go here.

If you enjoyed this, you may also like Love without Language:  Elephants Pay their Respects to Lawrence Anthony After his Death

A Boy’s Question


This is the latest entry in the 100-Word-Challenge for Adults.  This week’s challenge was to use the words “… I’m exhausted. Shut the door behind you..”

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“What’s the meaning of life?”  the boy asked the old man.

Rearranging noisy bones he replied, “Life has no meaning, boy.”

The boy stared, thunderstruck.

“But why are we here?”

“Look, to know what life is you first have to learn what life isn’t.  And believe me, son, there are almost as many things that life isn’t as there are stars in the sky.  When you’ve exhausted them all you’ll have your answer.”

“But I’ll never figure it out!” the boy whined.

“Some don’t,” the old man agreed.  “Now, I’m exhausted. Shut the door behind you so I can rest.”

He smiled as the door clicked closed.

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To see my other 100-Word-Challenge entries go here.  To learn more about the 100-Word Challenge for Adults, read here.

The Follies of Dainty-Dilly-Dalliness and Mysterious Eggs


The dwarves sat effort-knotted clenching the gnarled stump between them.  Derp hunched, tongue jammed up one toadstooly-nostril with effort.  He painted a wobbly line on the robin’s egg.

“Ack!  My fingers are too thickish for this dainty-dilly-dalliness,” he huffed.  “I don’t like painting eggs. I want to go home!”

Herp leapt to his feet, his bad eye spinning.

“I can help!” he cried.

With a grin as big as summer, he dug around in his pocket and produced a suspiciously large leathery egg.

“I found THIS one in the swamp!”

Derp grinned at the croc’s egg.

“I think you should just keep that prize in yer pocket awhile, Herpy boy.”

 

This is the latest entry in the 100-Word-Challenge for Adults.  This week’s challenge was the second part of two.  We were to take the last 10 words of another participant’s story and use it somewhere in our entry for this week.  You can see the original challenge here.

If you’d like to see the story I used the last 10 words from, visit How the Cookie Crumbles and read that story here.

To see my other 100-Word-Challenge entries, and more installments of this saga, go here.

The Frightening of Emily Bean: Attempt Number Two


Becoming a full-fledged demon was not an easy a task as one might imagine and Moribund the Shadow Thing was attempting demonhood. His target had unnerved him so utterly upon their first encounter he disappeared into the abyss entirely.

Now, it was time to try again.  He must frighten Emily Bean or risk losing his chance altogether.  He slithered from under her closet door and arched himself most sinisterly over her.

“Read me a story,” Emily smiled, flicking on her nightlight.

Moribund sagged.  Not again.  That cherub’s face…

Opening the book, he sighed,‘What was the rabbit late for,’ wondered Alice.”

Maybe this demon-thing wasn’t in the cards.

The above is my entry for the 100-Word-Challenge. The prompt this week was writing a piece with ….‘What was the rabbit late for,’ wondered Alice….. in it.  Next week the last line of each entry will be taken by another writer and used as a prompt for that challenge.

To see other entries, and more installments of this saga, go here.